2014 EP.

(Source: youtube.com)

istilldream - i will tremble, taking fire, should you walk from me like some summer morning

this is my solo project. limited 12” LP package coming soon, all proceeds raised will go directly to the German Shepherd Rescue of New England.

Mongolian Music - Circular Breathing and the Limbe

This is too cool. Skip to around 3:27 to hear the music. Apparently there are only 14 practicing Limbe players in the world. An instrument that might become extinct within our lifetimes..

I made a tumblr dedicated to photographing my life around East Boston and the north shore. 

Barbara Bosworth - Untitled (from the series “the Bitterroot River”)


Not music-related at all, but I found this picture to be incredibly profound. I love Bosworth’s work, especially this series. There’s such grace in this photograph, and simplicity. That’s how life should be. Simple.

(More available here, if you like this!)

Barbara Bosworth - Untitled (from the series “the Bitterroot River”)

Not music-related at all, but I found this picture to be incredibly profound. I love Bosworth’s work, especially this series. There’s such grace in this photograph, and simplicity. That’s how life should be. Simple.

(More available here, if you like this!)

@3:53

Steve Reich - Tehillim

By far my favorite Steve Reich piece. The harmonies in this are beyond words. Full screen this and turn off the lights, make sure to listen on good speakers or headphones, and get lost in the patterns. My favorite is the setting of Psalm 34:13-15, “Mihaish heychahfaytz chayyim”. (Around 13:08 in.)

32 mile bike ride to/from Salem, MA… some birds

32 mile bike ride to/from Salem, MA… some birds

Tags: birds

John Tavener - Funeral Canticle / Kliros

The other night, I fell asleep to watching the Tree of Life… (which, if there’s any movie to fall asleep to, it’s that). For the past few days, this has been on my mind. Again, not necessarily world music, but Tavener, coming from an Orthodox background (similar to Arvo Pärt), makes great use of the characteristic techniques used in Orthodox music.

The Funeral Canticle is broken up into 3 main ideas: 1, the Byzantine-influenced solo chant, a three-stanza poem (written by his friend and mentor, Mother Thekla of the Monastery at Normanby), and the kliros, which is borrowed from the traditional Orthodox funeral service. This piece was written in commemoration of his late father, Kenneth, and Tavener intended for it to be interdenominational in nature (which can be seen in its different sections.

The first section, in Greek (since there isn’t anything on the internet explaining the chant or the transliteration of text) is as follows:

Greek - Αἰωνία ἡμνήμη. Αἰωνία ἡμνήμη. Αἰωνία ἡμνήμη. (Αἰωνία αὐτόυ ἡμνήμη.)

English Transliteration - Eonía emnéemee. Eonía emnéemee. Eonía emnéemee. (Eonía aftóo emnéemee.)

(Rough) English meaning - “May your memory be eternal”

The other texts can be found here: http://lyrics.wikia.com/John_Tavener:Funeral_Ikos

To me, there’s a thread of solemnity and secular nature that runs through the piece. Similar to the traditional music of the Orthodox church, and the music of Arvo Pärt, Tavener’s use of silence and pause is extremely conscientious. In Orthodox music, the concept of “hesychasm”, or stillness, is more of a metaphysical, internal search for peace and contemplativeness. To me, there’s something that speaks with a timelessness and secular contemplation in those pauses before the kliros or settings of the poem.

Also,… if you haven’t yet seen Tree of Life, do it now. Terrence Malick used this piece perfectly, not to mention the movie itself is incredibly beautiful and powerful.

One more Ockeghem for the morning.

One of my favorite Ockeghem pieces. The Requiem is beautiful, but this particular movement jumps out at me. The movement in the voices is so beautiful.

John Sheppard (1515-1558) - Libera Nos, I & II - Performed by Stile Antico

One of the lesser known composers that championed the Tudor era of English Renaissance music (the other major composer being Thomas Tallis.) I don’t focus too much on Euro-centric music on here, but I’ve loved this piece for years and years. When I was on tour with a hardcore band in 2007, and it was my turn to drive, I’d listen to this (and several similar pieces) while I drove at night/early in the morning. I love contrast.

Shashmaqam - Court Music of Central Asia (including Uzbekistan!!)

Tambor - Uzbekistan

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dombura

In keeping with the Uzbekistan theme… It’s interesting to note that the music from Uzbekistan is largely Jewish (making it a Judeo-Asiatic ?? state), when being surrounded by largely Islamic countries.

This isn’t music-related (and it’s a bit older of an article), but I’m willing to bet it ties into music in some way..

After all, in most cultures, there are parallelisms between the different types of art. For instance, Japanese music and Sumi-e, the art of ink-wash painting, or flower arranging.. There are shared theories of balance, mathematics, and aesthetics (in Japanese music, silence having a large role.)

It’s interesting to see the algorithms that Penrose discovered in the 1970’s were being used in Islamic art and culture 500+ years earlier… I’m curious what are the ties between the incredibly complex patterns found in the Islamic tiling and music..